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Is CBD Golf's Magic Potion?

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CBD Oil is the hottest topic in golf right now!  Research is a little behind the speed that CBD Oil is being used but One thing is for sure, if Tiger Woods, Bubba Watson and Phil Mickelson are using and endorsing CBD brands then it’s worth learning how potentially you can improve your golf game.

Does it get you high? Is it legal

First, CBD is not marijuana. Rather, it is one of many cannabinoids or compounds that can be extracted from the cannabis plants that include the closely related marijuana and hemp plants. CBD and THC are the two compounds that get the most attention when it comes to cannabis research. THC is the psychoactive element that produces marijuana’s high. CBD is not psychoactive, and according to a World Health Organization report, unlike THC, CBD “is generally well tolerated, with a good safety profile. . . . [and] is not associated with abuse potential.”

But What Are The Effects Of Cbd?

What does CBD oil feel like?

The Real Truth About CBD.

CBD’s penetration as a retail product entails some distinct challenges for marketers. Those include not only explaining how CBD might be beneficial, but also allaying the confusion about what consumers are getting and how they should be using it.

At the moment, CBD companies have to walk a fine line that includes some stern fine print from the FDA. Technically, CBD cannot be used as a food additive in restaurants, although that stipulation hasn’t exactly deterred the practice. Still, states and municipalities are formulating rules while the FDA considers how far it will reach into CBD-infused menus. In a Washington Post story, one store owner in Colorado said adding CBD to his smoothies “makes everybody better . . . I tell people, ‘CBD—it’s a natural Tylenol and Xanax mixed together.’”

Every standalone CBD product must carry an FDA warning: “These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.” The agency has issued dozens of warning letters to companies promoting CBD products since 2015.

Still, CBD mania proceeds at an almost pandemic pace. The reasons are largely anecdotal, not the clinical verification you might see from experimental drug therapies. There is no doubt that CBD has real documented promise when it comes to treating specific childhood seizure disorders. CBD oil-based alternative treatments for a rare childhood epilepsy known as Dravet Syndrome spawned a cottage industry.

The FDA approved Epidiolex last year after controlled trials showed it significantly reduced or eliminated seizures in children with previously drug-resistant epileptic seizures. That made it the first FDA-approved, plant-derived cannabinoid medicine. A typical regimen costs $32,500 a year.

Its proven success in this specific case is compelling, but no doctor is handing out prescriptions for Epidiolex to help you battle the yips or loosen your frozen shoulder—certainly not at that price. But CBD also has been studied for more common maladies.

Those include an experiment involving improved public speaking, as well as animal studies evaluating CBD’s anti-inflammatory properties.

Currently, there are more than 150 ongoing studies of CBD’s effects, says Dr. J.H. Atkinson, co-director of the University of California’s Center for Medical Cannabis Research. But the picture isn’t entirely clear.

“There is very little evidence of efficacy as far as its use as an anxiolytic [anti-anxiety agent] or for pain and muscles aches,” Atkinson says, but he notes there are studies that show CBD acting on parts of the brain tied to emotions and the serotonin receptors thought to be involved in anxiety.

“How this might translate to ‘performance anxiety’ under competitive conditions is unknown,” he says, but “again, the potential here is certainly worth investigating.”

Just because interest in CBD is fueled by anecdotal claims doesn’t mean those claims aren’t valid. Rather, those with expertise in the field wish for more knowledge, a difficult commodity given that up until late last year, cannabidiol was a Schedule 1 drug and obtaining it for research purposes and getting that research funded was as problematic as funding marijuana research.

If CBD were only available as the high-priced Epidiolex, it likely would never have become the hot topic it now is for consumers, says Kent Hutchison, professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Colorado and founder of the Center for Research and Education Addressing Cannabis and Health. He has received funding from the National Institutes of Health to study the effects of CBD and served on a National Academy of Science committee that produced a 2016 report on the health effects of cannabis.

“We’re at the very beginning; we really don’t know yet,” Hutchison says. “I think in the long run this could be useful to people, just not in all the ways people are currently marketing it for.” Hutchison points out that past clinical trials of CBD sometimes have used much higher doses than what is often available at retail.
For example, in the study that involved reduced anxiety in public speaking, patients took 600 milligrams of CBD right before their speeches. That’s nearly a month’s supply in some CBD oil tinctures.

Best CBD Companies To Buy From?

What is the best CBD oil for pain relief? What is the best CBD to take? What is the best CBD dosage? What is the best CBD gummies? What is the CBD for sleep? What is best way to take CBD? What’s the latest on Phil Mickelson using CBD oil?

There are a lot of ‘what is’ questions on google with relation to using CBD oil for health and sport. But what are the best CBD companies or brands to use?

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